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OMS tops the charts

Posted: Thursday, Jan 19th, 2012




ALAMOSA — Colorado Department of Education 2011 performance scores are in and the Alamosa School District has received mixed reviews.

Ortega Middle School improved its overall state performance score in 2011.

“OMS is a top performing school,” said Alamosa School District Assistant Superintendent Mark Meyer during Tuesday’s Alamosa Board of Education meeting. “Congratulations.”

The state ranks middle school performance with four indicators: academic achievement, academic growth, academic growth gaps and test participation. OMS ranked above 50 percent in all categories.

OMS, which the state had on a performance plan, scored 56.3 percent – 14.1 out of 25 possible points – in academic achievement. This indicator reflects how a school’s students are doing at meeting the state’s proficiency goal, which is the percentage of students proficient or advanced on Colorado’s standardized assessments, according to the 2011 Colorado Department of Education School Performance Framework report.

In academic growth, OMS scored 75 percent – 37.5 out of 50 possible points – which meets state requirements. The indicator measures academic progress using the Colorado Growth Model, according to the report. It also reflects median growth, which compares student achievement state-wide and adequate growth, which quantifies whether this level of growth was sufficient for the typical student in this school to reach an achievement level of proficient or advanced on the CSAP within three years or by tenth grade, whichever comes first.

OMS scored 61.7 percent – 15.4 out of 25 possible points – in academic growth gaps. This indicator measures the academic progress of historically disadvantaged student subgroups and students needing to catch up, according to the report. The subgroups include students eligible for free/reduced lunch, minority students, students with disabilities and English language learners and students.

In regards to academic growth gaps, OMS met or approached state requirements in all but one area, according to the report. It failed to meet state requirements for students with disabilities.

In test participation, the state awarded OMS a 95 percent test participation rate, which met performance requirements.

Overall, OMS received a 67 percent ranking – 67 out of 100 possible points. This is a nine-point increase from 2010 when the school received a 58 percent ranking, Myers said.



Alamosa High School

Alamosa High School, which was on a state improvement plan, maintained or improved most of its scores in 2011. In addition to the aforementioned four indictors, postsecondary and workforce readiness was also considered.

In academic achievement, the school scored 50 percent – 7.5 out of 15 possible points. This is a seven-point increase from 2010 when the school received a score of 43 percent.

In regard to academic achievement, AHS met or approached state requirements in all but one area, according to the report. It failed to meet state requirements in reading.

AHS scored 50 percent – 17.5 out of 35 possible points – in academic growth, 41.7 percent – 6.3 out of 15 possible points – in academic growth gaps and 66.7 percent – 23.3 out of 35 possible points – in postsecondary and workforce readiness.

In regard to academic growth gaps, AHS did not meet state requirements in the following areas: students needing to catch up (reading), free/reduced lunch (mathematics), English Language Learners and students needing to catch up (writing).

In test participation, the state awarded AHS a 95 percent test participation rate, which met performance requirements.

Overall, AHS received a 54.6 percent ranking. This is a .9 point decrease from 2010.

“We are stable as far as accreditation,” Myers said. “A lot of this has to do with CSAP and ACT scores and graduation and drop out rates.”

According to the report, AHS four-year graduation rates met the 80 percent minimum state expectation. Dropout rates and Colorado ACT composite scores were at or below the state average. These scores are represented in the postsecondary and workforce readiness indicator.



Alamosa Elementary and overall district performance

Since the district’s elementary schools came together under one building in 2011, full performance reports are not available because the data belongs to institutions that no longer exist, Myers said.

The state, however, was able to provide some indicator data.

In regards to academic achievement in 2011, the elementary school met or approached state requirements in all but one area, according to the report. It failed to meet science requirements, with only 28.4 percent of students proficient or advanced in the subject.

Overall, the district showed growth in most areas.

In academic performance, the district scored 50 percent – 7.5 out of 15 possible points. This is a 10.4 percent increase from 2010.

The district scored 63.9 percent – 22.4 out of 35 possible points – in academic growth. This is an 8.3 percent increase from 2010.

In academic growth gaps, the district scored 54.8 percent – 8.2 out of a possible 15 points. This is a 6.7 percent increase from 2010.

The district scored 50 percent – 17.5 out of a possible 35 points. This is an 8.3 percent decrease from 2010.

Overall, the district received 55.6 percent ranking.

In addition, the state found that the district met both finance and safety requirements in 2011.


























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